Some Time in the City of London

Time flies when you’re flying high or rather, time goes really fast when you’re having fun.
Having the time of our life, in an instant, it hit us that it’s time we have to leave London soon.
Took a walk around the city to reminisce the moments we enjoyed during our stay here.
Listing a few places we visited on this lazy day, we start down at Trafalgar Square where we paid a visit to the church of St. Martin-in-the-Fields.
 
St. Martin-in-the-Fields
The church was designed by the Scottish architect James Gibbs, who had worked in Rome for the esteemed architect Carlo Fontana.
Gibbs was the first to successfully combine a Palladian temple front with a medievalstyle church steeple. The steeple is well in proportion with the magnificent Corinthian portico. At first Gibbs’s design was quite controversial, but it soon became the model for many other churches, in particular in the British colonies in North America.
The interior is noted for the beautiful plasterwork decoration on the barrel-vaulted ceiling, the work of Giovanni Battista Bagutti and Chrysostom Wilkins. Outside, take a close look at the beautiful church tower – clearly inspired by the steeples of Christopher Wren. But the star is really the monumental portico. Its pediment is supported by eight massive Corinthian columns. On either side of the church are two more columns, creating the impression of a portico that wraps itself around the church.
Previously, if you can remember from one of my previous entries, I had some pictures of St. Martin-in-the-Fields, when we were at Trafalgar square before. However, as we were there to visit the National Gallery, we didn’t have enough time to enter the church and that’s what we set out to do today.
After visiting the church, we made our way to the Palace of Westminster and of course, inevitably got to see the famous Abbey and clock tower of Big Ben.
En-route to Westminster Palace earlier, we passed by my favorite archway nearby.
Admiralty Arch is easily my favorite London arch. Often described as a triple archway, there are actually five arches when you count the two smaller outer arches.
Admiralty Arch
The design includes five arches faced with Portland stone. The center arch can accommodate auto or horse traffic but is only used for ceremonial occasions. The large arches on either side of the central arch are used for automobiles and the two smaller arches next to those are for pedestrian traffic.
This grand archway is the ceremonial gateway to Buckingham Palace and it also allows vehicular traffic and pedestrian access between Trafalgar Square and The Mall.
Admiralty Arch was originally commissioned by King Edward VII in memory of his mother, Queen Victoria. The Latin inscription at the top translates as follows: “In the tenth year of King Edward VII, to Queen Victoria, from most grateful citizens, 1910”. Edward however, did not live to see the work completed.
Till this day, I still have no clue why Marble Arch is the more popular archway, as Admiralty Arch looks far more superior in my personal opinion.
 
BT Tower
From Westminster Palace, our next destination was the BT Tower, but I prefer to call it “the Lightsaber Building”. Why? The BT Tower in London, England was transformed for one night only on the 15th of September, 2011 into a giant, 581-foot-high lightsaber! I wanted to check it out!
But why?
Why would Lucasfilm go to the expense of mounting over sixty 4.5kw at the top of a famous London skyscraper – a building that, admittedly, already looks like the handle of a lightsaber?
To celebrate the release of the Star Wars saga on Blu-ray, of course. The giant lightsaber beam itself was blue in color, hence it had a “blue ray” (get it?). I kid you not!
The beam shone over 600 meters into the night sky, and was reportedly visible from all over London. The best part of all: the whole thing was controlled by an iPad from the roof of an adjacent building.
The lightsaber was then activated at 8:30pm by C-3PO himself, Anthony Daniels.
Darth Vader and a legion of Stormtroopers were on hand for the event, of course.
Check out Vader “holding” the giant lightsaber in the photo here!
Pictures were sent to me by a friend and I wanted to see the BT Tower for myself.
Unfortunately, these are the shots I got.. =(
For starters, the tower was not even open on that very day!
Big disappointment! Oh well… Got over it and Oxford Street was next on the list.
Time for some shopping!
London is a shopping hub, NO! It is rather a shopping paradise in true sense.
The city brags its huge range of stores and markets to impress even the most discreet aficionados.
With so much to explore in the city, the departmental stores, unique boutique stores and luxury shopping malls are ideal destinations where you can lay your hands on anything you desire.
The best thing about London shopping is that it is not just one area to shop around. There are several shopping areas and markets dedicated to offer the best for visitors.
You can select the one that lies close to your accommodation.
For those visiting London primarily for shopping, can even select to stay at London hotels close to these streets.
Oxford Street
Naming the streets for shopping and missing Oxford Street is next to impossible for those who are aware what the area offers.
Running for over a mile and a half, the street has more than 300 shops, all lined up with the best bargains available!
Apparently, shopping also makes you hungry…
We had steak for dinner even though the saying goes as they say; “You haven’t been to London until you’ve tried the Fish & Chips”. I refuse to believe that, I’m here now, aren’t I?
(I’m just kidding, we’ve tried that already and the Beer Battered Fish & Chips was delicious!)
We had a lovely dinner before retiring for the night.
Here are more random pictures we took as we strolled down the streets of London.
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About Joshua Hideki

Hi! I'm Hideki. You can call me Josh! ʕ•ᴥ•ʔ Welcome!!~ This is a Travel Blog covering Japan, and many other bits & pieces of my personal life. Photography, Blogging, Fashion & Traveling in Style. A travel guide for everyone with these passions. Absorb the mesmerizing atmosphere, take in amazing sights & let the enchanting ambiance take you away as you embrace different cultures & see the world through my eyes - my Eternal Memories. Visit my Blog at: JoshuaHideki.com ! Come discover Japan from the inside with me and also we'll provide you with the best destinations to visit; and that includes the rest of the World too! Please enjoy! Discover Japan & Travel the World with me!! Life is precious, you only have one so live it to the fullest!

One thought on “Some Time in the City of London

  1. […] || []).push({}); Piccadilly Circus Piccadilly Circus is a busy square in the heart of London. It is famous for the fountain that was installed here at the end of the 19th century and for the […]

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